GLEN URQUHART HIGH SCHOOL
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SCHOOL PLANNING
 


Standards and Quality Report                                  

The Highland Council                                             


School:  Glen Urquhart High School

Head Teacher: Paul Milton

Date submitted: 25/06/19

 

Context of the school:

Including some or all of the following: local contextual issues; Scottish Attainment Challenge involvement; factors affecting progress (e.g. staffing changes/issues); and outcomes from authority quality improvement visits etc.

Including some or all of the following: local contextual issues; Scottish Attainment Challenge involvement; factors affecting progress (e.g. staffing changes/issues); and outcomes from authority quality improvement visits etc.

Glen Urquhart High School is the six-year, comprehensive school which serves the village of Drumnadrochit and Glenurquhart, which is a Glen running to the west of the village of Drumnadrochit. The school is a PPP (Public Private Partnership) school and is managed by the company Mitie. The school is very welcoming, the environment is of a very high quality and there is a sense of pride from everyone connected to the school. There are three associated primary schools: Glen Urquhart, Cannich and Balnain. Increasingly we are welcoming pupils from out-with our catchment area

At Glen Urquhart High School we have a very positive ethos where pupils, staff and parents feel a strong sense of ownership. Our pupils are very well behaved, hardworking and positive about the school. Relationships between pupils and staff, staff and parents are all very strong. Staff are extremely committed, approachable and want the very best for the school. The teachers, pupil support assistants, technician,  office staff ,janitorial, cleaning and catering staff all work as a team and know and support our pupils very well. They provide a wonderful experience for our pupils in their formative years. Pupils are offered a wide range of learning opportunities both within and outside the formal curriculum which help to widen their experiences helping them towards achieving successful and rewarding futures. Pupils this year were offered opportunities to attend theatre/cinema trips, participate in numerous sporting competitions/event, and offered places on school trips to Laggan and Germany.  At times, throughout the year, our staff go way beyond what is expected of them and it is this attitude which drives our continual success.

The school is an integral part of the community and is well supported by parents and other local partners. Strong partnerships continue to develop and provide further opportunities for our young people to develop skills and achieve. The Parent Council are a key partner to the school and not only contribute to the school improvement agenda but is very active in supporting the school and pupil activities through fundraising ventures.

The current school roll sits at 200 pupils. Teaching staff is 22.15. However, there are 24 teachers: 5 part-time. We have 6 PSAs supporting our pupils. We have 3 office staff, one F/T and 2 P/T. We have one technician who is P/T. We have 3 janitors. The school is managed by a senior management team of HT and acting DHT. There is a wider management team of 9, comprising Faculty Heads and Principal Teachers (Support). INSIGHT data recognises that all our pupils are from SIMD 6 and 7 although we have a significant number of pupils coming from challenging backgrounds.

The community ethos, where staff take time to get to know every pupil, has seen our attainment increase in recent years, where our students achieve well above the national average. Leavers’ data from INSIGHT shows the school also attains very favourably against our virtual comparators. Our high expectations and excellent pupil attainment is down to our experienced staff working closely with pupils, ensuring that they are all supported and encouraged in their learning to achieve their very best while preparing them for life, learning and work. On the whole our pupils enjoy excellent facilities, a wide range of curricular and non-curricular experiences and an extensive extra-curricular programme.  During this coming session pupils will each be given a Chromebook which we believe will improve on the school’s current ICT provision. The dedication shown by staff, the hard work by pupils and the continual support from our partners and the wider community can ultimately be evidenced by the strong Positive Destinations.

A group of Head Teachers have been seconded to create a “Change Team”. Their role is to work with schools based on the principles of collaboration and empowerment to enhance capacity, to support quality improvement work and develop improved approaches to learning and teaching.  They will lead “Improvement Family” meetings where Head Teachers, within each family, set an agenda to support and challenge each other. Our Improvement family includes Fortrose Academy, Grantown Grammar, Kingussie High School, Kilchuimen Academy and Kinlochleven High School.  The Change Team have responsibility for the 6 identified Improvement Pillars:

Pillar 1                   Building Positive Relationships/Nurture                          

Pillar 2                   Inclusion, Rights, Equalities & A.S.N.                                 

Pillar 3                   Safeguarding, Care & Wellbeing, Early Years                   

Pillar 4                   Pedagogy & Development  (L.A.A.C)                                 

Pillar 5                   Leadership of Change/ Improvement/Attainment/Local Government Benchmarking Framework  

Pillar 6                   Supporting Processes                                                           

In March 2018, a team of inspectors from Education Scotland visited Glen Urquhart High School.

The inspection team found the following strengths in the school’s work:

         As individuals and teams, staff successfully lead change in their areas of expertise and for whole-school projects.  Staff have a collaborative approach to improvement which results in very positive outcomes for young people.

         Young people are articulate, ambitious and confident.  They enjoy strong and respectful relationships with staff.

         Young people are highly motivated in their learning and dedicated to making the best possible progress.  They attain highly in National Qualifications, particularly at SCQF level 6 and 7.

         The pupil support team work effectively with staff, parents and partners to put in place support for young people’s care, learning and personal development.

The following areas for improvement were identified and discussed with the headteacher and representatives from The Highland Council:

         Develop more strategic, longer-term planning for improvement which has clearer expectations for when local and national priorities will be put in place.  An initial high priority should be given to the national programme, Developing the Young Workforce and the latest advice on S1 to S3 assessment. 

         Continue to build on the strengths of the curriculum to ensure that young people are receiving all of their entitlements.  This should include ensuring that statutory requirements are met.

         Build on current practice to produce a coherent, whole-school strategy for health and wellbeing.  From this, young people should be able to describe their progress in all aspects of health and wellbeing.

The Inspection Team summarised by stating –

“We are confident that the school has the capacity to continue to improve.  We will make no more visits in connection with this inspection”.

Last session we began work on the above “areas for improvement” and we will continue this work next session.

 

Education Scotland’s evaluations for Glen Urquhart High School were:

 

Quality indicators

Evaluation

Leadership of change

good

Learning, teaching and assessment

good

Raising attainment and achievement

very good

Ensuring wellbeing, equality and inclusion

good

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Vision, Values and Aims:

This session, as highlighted necessary by our recent inspection, we are reviewing and revising our Vision, Values and Aims. We hope to have these finalised by the beginning of next term. Our vision is always to provide a happy, caring and stimulating environment where children will recognise and achieve their fullest potential, so that they can make their best contribution to society.

As indicated these are currently being revised but at Glen Urquhart High School we aim:

1                       To provide a place of continuing education within which each pupil will participate in a range of learning opportunities designed to develop the essential skills, knowledge and understanding required by contemporary society.

2          To ensure that each pupil has an awareness of the possibilities available to him/her within society and the responsibilities required by society of him/her.

3                      To develop an atmosphere in which self-discipline and awareness of and responsibility to others will flourish.

4                      To develop a cohesive structure of courses and activities that will allow different needs, abilities and skills of pupils to develop to their fullest extent and encourage students to make reasoned and informed decisions for themselves.

5                      To maintain effective communication with parents concerning the progress of individual pupils and of the school.

6                      To provide a secure and happy environment within which staff and pupils can work together to achieve their aims.

7                      To maintain effective staff development for all staff working within Glen Urquhart High School.  We aim to develop leadership and partnership at all levels in working collaboratively and across departments.

8                      To actively promote a healthy approach to lifestyle for all persons involved with Glen Urquhart High School. 

9                      Glen Urquhart High School aims to provide a high quality secondary education through fostering personal development & health and fitness, encouraging equal opportunities and seeking continuous improvement in academic attainment at all levels, whilst also recognising achievements in all areas.

10        As part of our continuous improvement agenda, a quality assurance system based on self-evaluation is being further developed.  Staff, parents and pupils will be asked to make significant contributions.


Summary of Improvement Report/Plan engagement process:

Participants

Engagement details

Teachers and other staff

Principal Teachers’ Meetings

Staff Meetings

Working Group Meetings:

HGIOS4 Self Evaluation

Learning and Teaching

Closing Attainment Gap

Health and Wellbeing

Parents

Parent Council Meetings

Parent Information Evening

Parent Evaluations completed at the end of each Parents’ Meeting

Pupils

Pupil Focus Groups:

1.                    SQA Exam Results (13th Sept. 2018)

2.                  Library Enhancements (26th Sept. 2018)

3.                  Pupil Motivation (20th Nov. 2018)

4.                  Pupil Dress Code (22nd Nov. 2018)

5.                  Shieling 1 [S1 Participants] (11th Jan. 2019)

6.                  PE Dress Code (6th Mar. 2019)

7.                  Shieling 2 [All Participants] (17th May 2019)

 

Volunteers working in school (such as parents taking after-school activities, 3rd sector engagement etc.)

Highland High Life Activity Calendar produced at the beginning of each term indicates parental volunteer involvement in after-school activities.

Two parents coach girls’ rugby after school.

Parents support and participate in sponsored walk.

Parent helps coach competitive athletics at tournaments.

 

Other partners

HMIe Inspection

DYW meetings with Great Glen Consulting

Social Work – Children, Disability, Transition, Adult Services, Practice Lead

Live N Learn Motivational Workshop

Abriachan Trust

Skills for Work partners.

Eden Court

Inverness UHI

CSW

Ed Pysc

Highland Rugby Club

The Pines – Autism Support Services

Educational Psychology

CAMHS

Primary Mental Health Workers (PMHW)

Assistive Technology Support Service

Who Cares Scotland

Activity Agreement Coordinators

Skills Development Scotland

Reach for Reality

The Shirlie Project

Social Care Workers (Leault)

Speech and Language Therapy

The Bridge Education Unit

Barnardos

Youth Development Workers – Highlife Highland

NHS – school nurse, paediatrician

Occupational Health Therapy

ASN Officers

Area Youth Services Officer

EAL/ESOL Services

Paediatric Endocrine and Diabetes Specialist Team

Calman Trust

Cantrae Bridge

Accessible Arts Workers at Eden Court

Tree of Knowledge

The Shieling Project

Forestry Commission

Associated Schools Group

ASG meetings

ASG Transition Meetings

 

 


Full details of engagement activities can be found in the school’s self-evaluation records.

 

What have we done to close the attainment gap?

Evaluative account explicitly stating the impact of your work on reducing the attainment gap in your context, referring to supporting data.  This box must reference the impact of your Pupil Equity Fund spend and, if relevant, your Scottish Attainment Challenge spend.  Comments must refer explicitly to the National Improvement Framework Priorities as they apply to children and young people at risk of under-attainment through deprivation.

 

Closing the Attainment Gap Evidence

 

Review of Data from previous year:

 

Insight data for S4 Tarriff points analysed as S4 are first year to have direct impact of our CAG strategies from previous years. The figures here are positive, showing that our lowest 20% greatly outperform their Virtual Comparitors, and will be monitored next year at S5 and S4 levels to ensure continued progress.

 

SIMD details were analysed, which again look favourable. At their launch event for the Scottish Attainment Challenge, Education Scotland stated that success would see lower SIMD numbers evenly ‘scattered’ and not clumping at the bottom and this is what these figures show. Again it will be monitored next year at S5 and S4 levels.

 

To enable us to Close the Attainment Gap we have built a strong positive ethos which is frequently commented on by visitors to GUHS. This environment, where pupils strive to achieve their potential, is built on excellent teaching and pupil support and based on strong relationships between staff, pupils and the local community.  Virtually all of our pupils who have been identified as coming from challenging and deprived backgrounds attend school regularly as they enjoy coming to school.

 

While our main agenda has always been to raise the attainment for all pupils we have spent a significant amount of development time specifically aimed at raising the attainment of our “lowest 20%” with recent strong positive results, as can be seen on the graph below. We have also embedded curricular work, specifically looking at improving our already strong Literacy and Numeracy attainment (see graph below), which will be expanded on later in this document.

 

Our Closing the Attainment Gap working group implemented a number of successful strategies this session, creatively spending our allocation of PEF money. Many of the following strategies were created with the input of Pupil Voice, through Pupil Focus Groups held before and during this session as well as feedback from staff, parents and partners.

Using the same methodology as last session, the working group identified, using the Risk Matrix and other relevant data and clear professional knowledge of the pupils within our school, a number of pupils who would benefit from more targeted support next session (known as our ‘at risk’ pupils).

 

The working group then identified the following specific and whole school strategies to implement this session:

1.          Writing Workshop

2.         Shieling Project

3.         Nurture Room

4.         Reading in Registration

5.         Study Club

6.         Fruit for Thought

7.         Key Adults

8.         Laggan

9.         Seasons for Growth

10.       Maths materials and Numeracy in Registration

11.        SQA Awards focus

12.        Other

 

1.          Writing Workshop

We managed to secure a partnership with Moniack Mhor, the writing workshop based in our area. Through this we were able to send a small group of pupils to work with John Glenday, an award winning poet and writer, to further develop writing and literacy skills. The aim for this project is to have the pupils create some pieces of creative writing which we plan to have professionally published upon completion. The participating pupils were identified jointly by the English department and Learning Support department as ones who would benefit from additional writing tutoring. This project finishes in June 2019, so data analysis has not yet occurred.

 

2.         Shieling Project

In order to focus on self-confidence and self-belief the group also worked in partnership with the Shieling Project to once again offer an outdoor education leadership experience for our ‘at risk’ pupils. This strategy proved to be a success with the pupils as two Pupil Focus Groups and a Pupil Survey revealed a marked improvement in self-confidence and resilient attitudes from those involved. All of the pupils involved noted their improved confidence translated to academic work, reflected in the fact that nearly all of the pupils also improved in either Literacy or Numeracy over the year (albeit some pupils also participated in Paired Reading or Study Club as well):

 

This table has been anonymised for the purposes of this document.

 

 

 

3.         Nurture Room

Developed in preparation of arrival of S1 cohort for 2019/20 by PT ASN. Based on transition work being done between us and our ASG it was agreed that this would be of benefit to a large number of our incoming pupils. The PT ASN attended several days of training for this, including visiting schools with successfully embedded Nurture Rooms, before designing one suitable to our needs. This will help with health and wellbeing and welfare of our pupils. This will also be a safe space for pupils requiring further support.

 

4.         Reading in Registration – S1

The group established a peer training programme (led by ASN department) whereby S6 pupils were trained in paired reading skills and supported S1 pupils with this twice a week during registration. The results of this were positive:

 

Percentage of Pupils

Pupil Numbers

As can be seen, the figures improved from 50% at Levels 2 and 3, with no pupil recorded at Level 4, to 35% Levels 2 and 3 and nearly 30% at Level 4 by the end of the year.

 

5.         Study Club

Doubled our numbers from the previous session (from 3 to 6) – pupil feedback positive; as well as academic improvements it was noted that there was an improvement in self-confidence and relationships between the pupils involved. This has also provided opportunities to strengthen engagement with school by allowing pupils the chance to access support for their self-identified needs as pupils choose whether to focus on Literacy or Numeracy on any given session and worked through materials pre-prepared by English and Maths departments. It was led by two PSAs and funded for incentives which has encouraged attendance and made for a more relaxed ethos. Pupils from this group have now volunteered to speak at P7 Parents Night in June to explain how Study Club works to incoming P7, showing how their self-confidence has improved.

Throughout the year pupils kept a Record of Achievement where they could reflect and evaluate on their performance to date; this allowed them to target their studies to self-identified areas of need.

This is a voluntary club, which was opened out to all S1 this year and the nearly all of the pupils participating improved in Literacy and Numeracy.

Again, this table has been anonymised for the purposes of this document.

 

6.         Food for Thought

This whole school Health and Wellbeing strategy has continued this year and has again been well received by pupils who noted it helped their concentration and focus on the day(s) it was given. After an issue with suppliers during winter we changed to healthy cereal bars. This project to continue next year but will be revamped – Pupil Voice will be sought and pupils will implement and lead, with support from a Teacher Leader, any required changes.

 

7.         Key Adults

This initiative enhances first line guidance whereby all pupils in S1-4 are assigned a Key Adult who meet with them on a termly basis. Pupils identified as ‘at risk’ pupils meet twice a term with their Key Adult. This supports pupils with academic issues but also helps to support Child Protection issues as pupils feel secure enough with Key Adult to disclose issues.

 

8.         Laggan

This session we have used PEF money to support, ‘at risk’, FSM and pupils from low income families to attend a week long residential trip to Laggan, which is attended by a large number of S1-3 pupils from across the school. This helps ensure these pupils have wider opportunities and learning experiences than they otherwise might.

 

 

 

 

9.         Seasons for Growth

Seasons for Growth has been developed to assist young people, adults and their families to understand and manage the issues they experience because of significant change or loss in their lives.  This eight session programme is based on the belief that every individual should have access to support in time of pain and loss.  It is based on the belief that those who participate in the programme will, through the sharing of knowledge and development of skills, become more resilient and able to manage in difficult times.  Two of our teachers attended a two day training course and are planning to run the first Seasons for Growth course at Glen Urquhart High School.  Over the last few years a number of school pupils have struggled with different types of pain and loss.  We believe that this eight week course will help give these pupils the opportunities to safely share their experiences and develop the skills and tools that will effectively prepare them for the months and years ahead as they continue to deal with pain and loss in their lives. As a school we hope that the knock on affect will be that pupils in general will be better equipped to support one another and become more resilient as they go through the ups and downs of life.  We believe that Seasons for Growth is a course that will help us achieve this goal.

 

10.       Numeracy in Registration – S1

We have been running tutorials during registration that focus specifically on numeracy skills using a range of resources and precision teaching programmes. 

Percentage of Pupils

Pupil Numbers

 

This has resulted in an improvement, from 100% of pupils at Level 2 at the start of the year to 79% Level 2 and 21% Level 3 by the end of the year. We believe that further input from a Maths/Numeracy specialist would help drive the CAG working group forward next year, especially in this area.

 

11.        SQA Awards

Aim to ascertain what pupils could achieve through their natural experiences.

So far:

1.          National 4 Practical Cookery Award or Units (depending on outcomes) for all S6 pupils through S5 and S6 Elective Practical Cookery.

2.         National 3 Media Unit: Analysing Media Content for all S3 pupils through English film analysis lessons and assessments.

3.         National 3 Religion, Belief and Values Award or Units (depending on outcomes) through a combination of S3 YPI experience and subsequent S3 English/RMPS joint learning approach.

4.         National 4 Literacy and Numeracy – a continued focus on ensuring all pupils leave with at least this level of award.

5.         National 5 Numeracy – a renewed focus on supporting National 4 Maths pupils to achieve this as well (please note: almost all S4 pupils sat National 5 English this year).

The aim for next year is to add Science Units to this suite of Awards available to pupils through natural participation; as well as exploring Employability Awards, Mental Health Awards and any other appropriate qualification.

 

12.        Other Expenditure

Other PEF expenditure has been to purchase BGE Level 3 and 4 resources and textbooks for Literacy, Numeracy and Science to ensure pupils are as well prepared as possible to reach these standards and to succeed in their future National Qualifications. Coupled with this was the strategy of bringing in the motivational speaker from ‘Live n’ Learn’ to help prepare the Senior Phase pupils for their SQA exams.

 

Next session’s PEF plans include continue working with the Shieling Project and Moniac Mhor, to look at expanding lifeskills experience in and outwith school, offer further leadership experiences for pupils throughout the school, to build on the experiences here to offer further Numeracy opportunities, to explore the Prince’s Trust Award for use with targeted S1 pupils and to enhance our parental links by increasing parental participation in some of these projects.

All plans will be discussed and agreed by the working group to suit our local needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What have we done to improve attainment, particularly in literacy and numeracy? (refer to specific projects and outcomes)

 

Literacy and Numeracy practice at registration continued in S1 and was expanded to include S2. Registration teachers and pupils were positive however a minority of pupils found it repetitive .We do not foresee making any changes to the content of the material but may allow pupils to start at different places. There is an increased need for consolidation of basic facts as numeracy SNSA scores for primary 7 for our S1 intake were low. As a result of this we will bring the numeracy at registration program forward to start in October .This will also allow the seniors to be involved without the imminent pressure of exams looming.

Numeracy

             Weekly after school study for all S1 and identified CAG S1 to S3 pupils with an emphasis on numeracy and literacy.

         Our BGE assessments now   track progress more precisely using the benchmarks.

            We trialled Mathletics in the BGE and after positive reviews gained funding for next year. The software allows us to track the progress of a pupil’s numeracy journey and affords them materials to use at home to consolidate learning experienced in the classroom.

             We again hosted a transition event “Building Numeracy Skills”. Primary 7 pupils participated in activities (a further 2 activities added from last year) to highlight where they would encounter numeracy in high school across departments. Very positive feedback received from pupils.

• To raise the attainment of  pupils in the Senior Phase we again supported and presented appropriate students at the Numeracy level above the National level they were presented at. This worked well with one targeted pupil coming back to the department in S6 for 10 weeks to attain a Nat5 numeracy.

•Last year with S3 pupils in the lower set starting on the national 4 Expressions and Formula unit it freed up enough time for all our Nat4 pupils to gain a national5 Numeracy award.

 

Literacy

         We have a highly ambitious presentation policy in the Senior Phase, with 97% of S4 pupils sitting National 5 English and 97% of S5 pupils sitting Higher English. Our inclusive approach to presentation encourages every learner to strive to attain as highly as they possibly can in literacy.

         We have used a range of strategies to develop the literacy skills of BGE pupils, including paired reading, reading homework, protected reading time at the beginning of lessons and a PSA-supported after-school literacy club. Pupil feedback suggests these measures are popular and aid learning. This is substantiated by positive attainment data, which shows that 78% of S3 pupils have reached Level 4 in Reading. No S1 pupils had gained Level 4 in Reading the beginning of the session, but recent testing indicates that now almost 30% of the cohort has attained at this level.  

         We have revamped close reading resources and assessments to reflect the literacy and English benchmarks and provide greater continuity between the development of close reading skills in the Junior and Senior Phases. These modifications have added robustness to our assessment procedures, resulting in a stronger correlation between departmental and SNSA attainment data. The reliability of our BGE assessments has also been verified and validated by English practitioners from other schools in the region.          

         Our commitment to closing the attainment gap has led to the department establishing links with Moniack Mhor, a local creative writing centre, with the aim of improving the written work, creativity and self-esteem of pupils most at risk from the poverty-related attainment gap. Having engaged with a range of data – Risk Matrix, free school meals, SNSA, Pupil Support and faculty – we have identified a group of young people who are most likely to benefit from this initiative. With money from the Pupil Equity Fund, we are engaging the services of a professional writer, who is lending his expertise to pupils during the creative writing project. Once completed, learners’ work will be professionally published, an event which will be celebrated in the school and to which members of the local community, including carers, family and friends, will be invited. Thus far, learners have only attended one of four scheduled workshops, but initial pupil feedback has been very positive. We will measure the impact this programme has on the attainment of affected pupils in due course.   

         In addition to helping pupils gain SQA recognition in English, we are committed to providing pupils with opportunities to use their literacy skills to access additional pathways to attainment. We work closely with our colleague in Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies to enable our S3 pupils to secure a Religion, Belief and Values Award at SCQF Level 4. Our pupils also have the chance to gain additional SCQF points in Scottish Studies and Media.       

 

Next Session we are planning

•More pupils from S3 have been challenged by parents and staff to enter S4 at National5 level. This should hopefully result in a Nat 5 qualification over one or two years but at least a Nat4 maths and Nat5 numeracy in S4and experiencing higher numeracy levels than taking the route of National4 in S4. 

• To meet with primary heads to discuss how SNSA results can inform main areas for improvement and discuss associated teaching methods.

 • This year we found it difficult timewise to use the weekly quizzes in Maths for all year groups but intend to incorporate their use into their chrome book experience.

      BGE Trial 1 weeks of  circa 5 short homework questions,1 week Mathletics(PEF Money)  and  1 week of longer homework. Using Mr Carter Maths (PEF money)

• We aim to have   a Numeracy specialist join the CAG group to help implement more specialised strategies.

         PT English and languages will meet with the head teachers of the Associated Primaries to discuss how best we can ensure fluency and coherent progression in literacy learning between upper primary and secondary BGE.

         Continue to develop strategies to aid the literacy learning of pupils most at risk from the poverty-related attainment gap.

         Increase opportunities for pupil voice to ensure the BGE curriculum is meeting the needs of all literacy learners.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What have we done to improve children and young people’s health and wellbeing? (refer to specific projects and outcomes)

 

The Health & Wellbeing Working Group met regularly throughout the year and is now under new leadership to allow opportunity to develop leadership skills further.

         The working group organised two Health & Wellbeing Days for pupils (S1-3 and S4-6) with the main focus being “Active” and “Respected”.  Within these themes we focused three workshops on being “active” and two workshops on being “respected”. These were taken from the health and wellbeing indicators which involve giving pupils the opportunities to take part in activities such as play, recreation and sport, which contribute to healthy growth and development for the “active” indicator. They also include having the opportunity to be involved and heard in decisions that affects each individual for the “respected” indicator.

 The active sessions involved physical activity workshops – A hill run and circuits. There was also a mind-active session which themed around mindfulness. The respected sessions included a workshop on self-respect/positive body image and the final session focused on respecting the law. We were lucky enough to get the royal navy involved and they came in to run the circuit session, to give pupils a taster to the kind of training recruits experience in the navy.

          Over the last five years the group has organised and run workshops including all 8 of the wellbeing indicators. We are now in a position to run the sessions on a rotation for the foreseeable future.

         Alongside this, the group has been discussing and developing ideas for a new house system within the school.  The group is still working on this and hope to launch the new house system as soon as we can.

          One idea that is still to be investigated is how to check on & track each pupil’s health & wellbeing.  This may involve using the Health & Wellbeing Indicators Circle (Safe, Healthy, Active, Nurtured, Achieving, Respected, Responsible, Included) to find out from each pupil who they feel on a scale of 1 to 10 on each of these indicators.  This is an area that needs further development.

         Another area of development will be to encourage subject teachers to make sure that Health & Wellbeing outcomes are part of their lessons on a regular basis.

 

 

 

 

 

What have we done to improve employability skills and help our children and young people achieve sustained, positive school leaver destinations? (refer to specific projects and outcomes)

 

         Great Glen Consulting once again provided our S3 pupils with a very successful “Week of Work”. However in an attempt to reduce costs we will set up a working group to arrange this successful “Week of Work” and to explore ways to embed other areas of DYW as part of daily practice.

         During this same week over thirty of our partners presented at our annual Careers Fair. This was very well attended and invites were issued to pupils from our Associated Primary pupils.

         A CPD event was held to enable staff to embed work opportunities within their lessons (MYWOW). The site also provides staff with clear information on future career opportunities linked to theirs subjects.

         During study leave our S3 pupils, who work on the ASDAN short course “Careers and Experiencing Work”, all had a week of Work Experience, in May, which is directed at their current thoughts and interests. Once again, as a result of reducing resources at the centre, this Work Experience has become very challenging to manage. We will now focus on and provide Work Experience for individual pupils if and when it is appropriate rather than provide S3 with a week of work experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our overall evaluation of the school’s capacity for continuous improvement:

* We are confident in our capacity for continuous improvement

* We have some concerns about our capacity for continuous improvement

Comment:

 

 


QI 1.1 Self-evaluation for self-improvement

How would we evaluate this QI using the HGIOS?4 six-point scale?

Choose one evaluation from the six options.

Excellent    Very Good    Good

Satisfactory    Weak    Unsatisfactory

How are we doing? What’s working well for our learners? What are the features of effective practice in our school?)

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS FROM LAST YEAR’S IMPROVEMENT PLAN

How do we know?  What evidence do we have of positive impact on our learners?

 

MAKE BRIEF REFERENCES TO SUPPORTING DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

What could we do now?  What actions would move us forward?

 

improvement priorities highlighted in this area – SIP PRIORITIES SELECTED FROM THESE

THEMES

·      Collaborative approaches to self-evaluation

 

 

 

 

 

·      Analysis and evaluation of intelligence and data

 

 

 

 

·      Ensuring impact on learners’ successes and achievements

•The use of Pupil Focus Groups for particular topics has allowed us to tailor our approach to the benefit of the pupils.

•The Key Adult programme has allowed staff and individual pupils to work together to develop unique learning strategies. This programme has been adapted to more intensely support the identified CAG pupils. However with current budgetary pressures the existing programme is unsustainable.

•There is an annual period set aside for professional reading in the school calendar, in addition to that already regularly undertaken by staff.

•The Guidance team know their pupils very well and hold Options Meetings with them to discuss learning ambitions.

•After the prelims the SMT interview every Senior Phase pupil in S4 and S5 to discuss results, analyse individual results together and to formulate study plans to address any identified learning needs.

•The Faculty/Peer to Peer Learning Visits involve consulting and agreeing on a particular focus.

•Professional dialogue is an intrinsic part of our school culture: Staff Meetings and PT Meetings are collaborative in nature; more informal professional dialogue happens on a regular basis.

•Pupils complete self-evaluation forms in a large number of subjects. This raises actions for the pupils & their next steps plus it also identifies teachers’ next steps.

•After Parents Evenings, evaluations are submitted by parents.

•Parental engagement is sought through the Parent Council. The Parent Council took part in the same Vision, Values and Aims activity that staff and pupils undertook.

•We collaborate with outside agencies to enhance the learning provision for our pupils (such as Eden Court Theatre staff to produce our annual show; this improves pupil confidence and health and wellbeing).

•The school Working Groups are collaborative in approach and are designed to target areas identified as priorities; some, such as Health and Wellbeing Group seek pupil feedback after running events and use this to inform future plans.

•SMT engage in results analysis with link departments at the start of each new academic year.

•Insight data is analysed at whole school, PT and departmental level and any trends identified are subsequently tackled.

•BGE Tracking and Monitoring is regular and analysed at SMT, PT and class level.

•SMT Learning Visits are held in a condensed window: a report highlighting good practice is subsequently written and shared with staff.

• An evaluation of the ASN department by class teachers and a thorough self-evaluation exercise has been carried out by the ASN department. These have been analysed to further develop good practice.  

•HMIe Summarised Inspection Findings 2018.

•We have consistently high levels of attainment amongst our Senior Phase pupils.

•Our Literacy and Numeracy levels are above comparator levels according to Insight data.

•We have consistently excellent positive destinations for our pupils according to Insight data. This year this was recorded at 100%.

•Data analysed and plans put forward in Departmental Improvement Plans.

•We have a positive ethos in the school, which is immediately evident on arriving at the school. Pupils enjoy coming to school, our study clubs are well attended by Senior Pupils and all pupils feel confident and respected enough to speak to SMT and Key Adults (and, indeed, any other member of staff).

•Positive feedback from parents and pupils after events.

 

 

•Information on pupil evaluation sheets will have key factors the students need to address to move their work forward & improve the quality of the work produced. Parents also have access to this information.

 

 

Focus on capturing pupils’ wider experiences and achievements – perhaps incorporating Key Adult and Seemis records.

 

Continue to widely share with pupils and the community the findings of Pupil Focus Groups.







 

QI 1.3 Leadership of change

How would we evaluate this QI using the HGIOS?4 six-point scale?

Excellent    Very Good    Good

Satisfactory    Weak    Unsatisfactory

 

How are we doing? What’s working well for our learners? What are the features of effective practice in our school?)

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS FROM LAST YEAR’S IMPROVEMENT PLAN

How do we know?  What evidence do we have of positive impact on our learners?

 

MAKE BRIEF REFERENCES TO SUPPORTING DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

What could we do now?  What actions would move us forward?

 

improvement priorities highlighted in this area – SIP PRIORITIES SELECTED FROM THESE

 

THEMES

·      Developing a shared vision, values and aims relevant to the school and its community

 

 

 

·      Strategic planning for continuous improvement

 

 

 

 

·      Implementing improvement and change

·           Stakeholders are consulted to seek broad agreement on proposed changes within the school. The Parent Council is proactive and makes a very positive contribution to the life of the school. Parents and partners have opportunities to influence developments. There are effective systems in place to ensure that parents are well-informed. Partner organisations, including local businesses, Highlife Highland and other organisations, are highly positive about the quality of their relationships with the HT and staff. They share a strong commitment to securing positive learning outcomes for young people. At an informal level, stakeholders benefit from good communication and the school’s strong sense of community.

·            

·         All staff are committed to continuous improvement. Teachers are actively involved in professional learning and whole-school improvement activities. This includes peer-learning visits. Teachers also afford young people opportunities for personal and wider achievements. Staff enthusiasm for collegiate and collaborative working is a major strength. This results in staff having a clear and continuous focus on improving young people’s experiences.

·         This annual Standards and Quality report is clear and comprehensive. It is based on key quality indicators from How Good is our School? This, along with the review of the previous year’s improvement plan, generates a baseline evaluation of the school. During the current session, in response to national and local authority priorities, staff have focused and will continue to mainly focus on redesigning and adapting National Qualification courses.

·         A new curriculum structure, which has included a number of electives for our S5/6 pupils and additional IDL lessons in the BGE, has been successfully implemented. School leaders and staff have had a thorough and effective approach to planning these changes to the curriculum. As a result implementation has been smooth. Most young people are positive about these new additions to the curriculum.

·         Principal Teachers lead their curriculum areas well. As a group, they provide effective leadership and management of whole-school initiatives. Faculty Standards and Quality reports are detailed, comprehensive and reflect extensive data analysis and discussion about improving Glen Urquhart High School. There is a very effective flow of intelligence between senior leaders, faculties and departments. This is supported by a series of meetings. This ensures that all teaching staff are well-informed of school developments.

·         Teachers (and DHT) lead well-established working groups which are collaborative and pro-active by nature. Leadership of these groups change, in a managed way, to provide experience to staff who wish to pursue leadership opportunities in the future. These Working Groups provide an effective channel for major school improvements and are at the centre of whole school development initiatives. This session working groups have focused on learning and teaching, closing the attainment gap, health and wellbeing and the school’s Vision, Values and Aims. These groups make good use of external research which is translated into well-received professional development for colleagues. Some initiatives, such as tracking and monitoring and aspects of pedagogy, have become embedded into practice.

·         School leaders and staff have taken positive steps to close the attainment gap. A working group has effectively planned and implemented support for young people at risk of missing out. This includes the use of Pupil Equity Funding (PEF). The working group has made extensive use of external research to draw up an appropriate, multi-faceted plan of action. The resultant benefits for young people entail supported study, mentoring projects and a range of confidence-building activities.

·         Young people enjoy attending school and contribute positively. They are good at expressing their views and making suggestions for improvement. Pupil Focus Groups help staff to evaluate the impact of specific projects. Young people at the senior stages play a major, proactive part in school life. There are several examples of improvements to the school which stem directly from young people. Many young people at the senior stages undertake leadership roles effectively and mentor younger learners.

HMIe Summarised Inspection Findings 2018.

 

Staff, PT and Department Minutes.

 

Working Group Minutes.

 

ASG Minutes.

 

Parent Council Minutes.

 

Partnership meetings minutes.

 

Staff regularly request and willingly engage in CPD opportunities and leadership courses.

 

SMT Visit report.

 

Faculty Learning Visit reports.

 

Peer to Peer Visit reports.

 

The school’s new Vision, Values and Aims, about to be completed, reflect the school’s strong relationship with its community and its ambitions for young people. They have been produced with the involvement of young people, staff and  parents/partners to ensure shared ownership of its outcomes.

 

 

 

Ensure all newly-introduced initiatives within the school are subject to rigorous and timely evaluation.

 

 

Continue to develop more opportunities for young people in S1 – S3 to develop further their leadership skills and confidence.







 

 

 

 

 


QI 2.3 Learning, Teaching and Assessment

How would we evaluate this QI using the HGIOS?4 six-point scale?

Excellent    Very Good    Good

Satisfactory    Weak    Unsatisfactory

How are we doing? What’s working well for our learners? What are the features of effective practice in our school?)

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS FROM LAST YEAR’S IMPROVEMENT PLAN

How do we know?  What evidence do we have of positive impact on our learners?

 

MAKE BRIEF REFERENCES TO SUPPORTING DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

What could we do now?  What actions would move us forward?

 

improvement priorities highlighted in this area – SIP PRIORITIES SELECTED FROM THESE

THEMES

·      Learning and engagement

 

 

 

·      Quality of teaching

 

 

 

·      Effective use of assessment

 

 

 

·      Planning, tracking and monitoring

·         In classes, staff and young people benefit from a calm, friendly and purposeful ethos. They enjoy mutual respect and very positive relationships. A sense of community is evident. Staff know the young people very well and set high expectations of them. Young people are very proud of their school. They appreciate the high levels of support they receive from staff, both in and beyond the classroom. Young people engage with planned opportunities across different contexts for learning. In so doing, they develop different sets of skills, as well as contribute to aspects of the wider school and community.

·         Young people engage very well in their learning. They are articulate, ambitious and assimilate their learning using higher order skills. Most young people welcome opportunities to be challenged in their learning as a means to assist them in maintaining appropriate progress. In lessons, young people understand the purpose of their learning. Young people work collaboratively and reflect on their progress in the majority of lessons. They have opportunities to lead aspects of learning.

·         Pupil Support Assistants (PSAs) provide valuable support to young people. This enables targeted young people to work alongside their peers and to be more included in the learning activities of the class. At the senior phase, teachers plan differentiated approaches to help meet the needs of the young people.

·         In the BGE and senior phase, almost all departments have developed tracking and monitoring approaches that show young people’s working levels and targets, as well as attainment over time. In the senior phase, this also includes progress of young people with protected characteristics. Young people who are not on track to achieve are supported appropriately.

 

HMIe Summarised Inspection Findings 2018.

 

 

INSIGHT results data shows consistently high levels of attainment.

 

BGE Literacy and Numeracy results for S3 2018/19 continue to be very strong.

 

Positive Staff feedback on CPD.

 

Classroom visits have highlighted that the CPD provided by the L & T working group has had a positive impact.

 

SMT Visit report.

 

Peer Learning Visits feedback.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is recognised that in a small school young people within a class are learning towards a National Qualification at more than one SCQF level. Teachers will need continued professional learning to manage such situations.

 

Continue to develop differentiated approaches to learning and share effective practice in order that young people experience appropriate levels of support and challenge consistently across the school.

 

Young people’s learning is deepened by using digital technology. Overall, staff feel that the current use of digital technologies is somewhat hampered as a result of unreliable connectivity to the internet and older machines. However next session Chromebooks will be issued to every pupil in the school and there will be a refresh of all other managed machines. This should produce opportunities for deeper learning through the use of digital technology.

 

Across all curricular areas, teachers should are using the National Benchmarks and related moderation activity to enable more robust professional judgements of the achievement of levels.

 

The school’s existing BGE Tracking and Monitoring system (TMR) will have to be reviewed and adapted around the Benchmarks.







 


QI 3.1 Ensuring wellbeing, equality and inclusion

How would we evaluate this QI using the HGIOS?4 six-point scale?

Excellent    Very Good    Good

Satisfactory    Weak    Unsatisfactory

How are we doing? What’s working well for our learners? What are the features of effective practice in our school?)

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS FROM LAST YEAR’S IMPROVEMENT PLAN

How do we know?  What evidence do we have of positive impact on our learners?

 

MAKE BRIEF REFERENCES TO SUPPORTING DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

What could we do now?  What actions would move us forward?

 

improvement priorities highlighted in this area – SIP PRIORITIES SELECTED FROM THESE

THEMES

·      Wellbeing

 

 

 

 

 

·      Fulfilment of statutory duties

 

 

 

 

 

·      Inclusion and equality

·         Young people are well cared for and are treated with respect and dignity. The school environment has a strong relationship-based culture. There is a clear sense that young people are known and treated as individuals by staff. This results in a very positive climate for learning for young people.

·         The health and wellbeing working group has made an encouraging start to creating a whole-school approach to wellbeing as a responsibility of all. Annual health and wellbeing days focus on selected wellbeing indicators and involve creative approaches to delivery. There is also a wide variety of activities and approaches across the school which promote health and wellbeing.

·         The school has revised its approach to personal support and introduced ten minutes of registration each day. In addition, there is a key adult programme, which provides almost all young people with regular, termly opportunities to speak with a member of staff about their progress. Teachers and PSAs participate in this programme. Young people speak positively about the support they receive from their key adult.

·         The school works well with others, for example, National Health Service (NHS), Police Scotland, The Shieling Project, Youth Work and Active Schools Scotland to support the wellbeing of young people. There are opportunities to take part in a wide-range of activities which support healthy lifestyle choices. These include physical activity, nutrition, social and emotional wellbeing and keeping safe in a range of age-appropriate contexts.

·         Across the school, young people are positive about their experiences at the school. They feel welcomed, supported and involved in the life of their school. Exclusion levels in recent years have been declining within the school. Almost all young people enjoy positive relationships with their peers and staff.

·         Young people value the opportunities provided in personal and social education (PSE) to cover topics such as poverty; staying safe, including the use of social media; the environment; input from the Careers Adviser; preparation for the Week of Work and work experience in S3. In S5 and S6, there are opportunities for each young person to develop their curriculum vitae and personal statements.

·         The principles of Getting it Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) underpin the work of the pupil support team. These enable them to identify and address the needs of young people who require additional support. Staff work together effectively to offer individualised programmes and interventions which support young people’s learning and improve their levels of confidence and success. Daily pupil support morning meetings are effective in providing opportunities for staff to share up-to-date information and approaches. Pupil support staff produce helpful pupil profiles which provide staff with details of young people’s interests, strengths and specific strategies to support their learning and achievement. These are available online for staff to gain easy access. This unified approach to support is enabling young people to participate in learning, with consistent supportive approaches which are shared and used by all staff. In addition, senior leaders provide staff with opportunities for timely, relevant professional learning on particular health needs. This enhances staff knowledge, understanding and skills and equips them to better meet the learning and wellbeing needs and entitlements of all young people. The pupil support team works effectively with staff, parents and partners to put in place interventions for young people at risk of underachieving. These are enabling young people to make good progress in their learning and attain National Qualifications. Young people benefit from effective arrangements for assessments and certification.

·         Effective primary to secondary transition pastoral and support programmes are in place. A few members of staff from the secondary school also teach in one of the associated primaries. They speak positively of the impact that this approach has on young people. It is reported to develop trusted relationships and increase confidence and resilience. There are shared services across the associated school group, for example in mental health support. Young people, with a range of additional support needs, benefit from enhanced transition arrangements. These transitions help them to feel more confident, secure and optimistic about what they can achieve. Staff work well with a wide range of partners to plan for transition and progression to positive destinations beyond school. They use the SDS needs matrix well to identify young people most at risk, and target resources and services appropriately. Transitions for young people with additional support needs are well-supported and planned well in advance to ease transition to their next steps beyond school.

 

HMIe Summarised Inspection Findings 2018.

 

 

Minutes of H&W working group.

 

 

Pupils filled in evaluation forms to help us with planning for future events.

 

 

Consistently high achievement and positive destinations.

 

High ‘staying on’ rate.

 

 

Key Adult conversations (minuted on SEEMis) help to support pupils as individuals.

 

Staff model behaviour supporting wellbeing for all:

1.          Leading activities during H&WB days.

2.         Coaching sports teams and leading extra-curricular activities.

3.         Acting as mentors, both formally through Key Adult programme and informally by having positive relationships.

 

 

 

 

Success of Activities Week can be evidenced by numbers of students attending the residential trip and participation in other activities. Positive feedback from pupil focus group. This session more activities were on offer which all pupils could be included in and there was noticeable increase in uptake from pupils with ASN.

 

Develop a new sustainable programme to continue with the very successful Key Adult programme.

PSA Key Adults will continue to provide more extensive support for CAG pupils. This will be paid from our PEF budget.

 

 

Continue to review aspects of PSE provision taking account of the experiences, views and needs of all young people.

 

Continue to explore opportunities for young people with additional support needs to experience a wide range of courses and programmes, including those leading to accreditation.

 

Continue to build a strategic whole-school approach to promoting and supporting the wellbeing of all young people.

 

The further use of the wellbeing indicators, outwith the H&W Working Group,  would be useful in helping staff and young people to reflect on how well needs are being met;  take account of and evaluate the ongoing work for wellbeing across the school.

QI 3.2 Raising attainment and achievement

How would we evaluate this QI using the HGIOS?4 six-point scale?

Excellent    Very Good    Good

Satisfactory    Weak    Unsatisfactory

How are we doing? What’s working well for our learners? What are the features of effective practice in our school?)

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS FROM LAST YEAR’S IMPROVEMENT PLAN

How do we know?  What evidence do we have of positive impact on our learners?

 

MAKE BRIEF REFERENCES TO SUPPORTING DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

What could we do now?  What actions would move us forward?

 

improvement priorities highlighted in this area – SIP PRIORITIES SELECTED FROM THESE

THEMES (HGIOS?4)

 

·      Attainment in literacy and numeracy

 

 

 

 

·      Attainment over time

 

 

 

 

·      Overall quality of learners’ achievement

 

 

 

 

·      Equity for all learners

 

  • Young people benefit from a broad range of opportunities beyond the school and classroom to develop their skills and achievements. They participate in activities, clubs and groups provided both by the school and in the community.
  • The school has an established approach to celebrating and recognising young people’s achievements. Good use is made of social media, newsletters and displays to share successes and activities with the wider school community. Young people also take responsibility for gathering and sharing news and information to the wider community. Young people in senior phase appreciate the opportunities they have to discuss their learning and achievements with guidance teachers. They recognise how their participation enhances skills for work and contributes to personal statements in applications to universities.
  • Young people across the school feel their successes, engagement and participation in a range of activities, competitions and initiatives are well-supported by the school. These include sporting successes, school shows, art and musical performances and public-speaking. Young people take their responsibilities seriously, both as individuals and part of teams, as they represent their school at local authority, national and international events. Young people are afforded opportunities to get involved in areas of interest to them.
  •  Staff in the Music Department work closely with instrumental teachers, both in school and locally, to support pupils sitting ABRSM individual music examinations in voice, strings, brass and piano. Departmental input includes accompanying/rehearsing performance pieces with pupils and coaching them in the specific  areas of aural perception and sight reading, together with exam techniques and management of nerves. Results this session have included distinctions at grades iii, iv, v and vi on piano , French Horn, violin and voice.
  • The school has developed and supported events which build links with others in the community. This has included hosting a Senior Citizens’ party, securing funding for sports, the Shieling Project, and work experience with local businesses and employers. Young people also participate in foreign, residential and field trips. These assist young people to broaden and shift their horizons and expectations.
  • In partnership with Highland Highlife pupils from S3 are offered the opportunity to gain their DofE Bronze Award.

 

 

HMIe Summarised Inspection Findings 2018.

 

Insight Data.

 

Authority Produced Data spreadsheet.

 

ASN Matrix update for BGE attainment in Literacy and Numeracy.

 

Strong rate of positive destinations.

 

Ever increasing numbers of pupils taking Advanced Highers this year.

 

Some pupils gain apprenticeships and employment with local firms, suggesting GUHS is valued within the community.

 

 

Pupils contribute widely to whole school events (i.e. S6 pupils supporting a week long residential trip in May).

 

The number of pupils gaining N5 Literacy and N5 Numeracy concurrently with N4 English and N4 Maths is rising.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Positive feedback from parent and pupil evaluations.

 

Working Group Minutes.

 

Staff, PT and Department Minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Adult conversations are recorded on SEEMiS.

 

Key adult evaluations.

The school needs to develop further tracking, monitoring and profiling of achievements to focus on the skills being developed and to identify young people who may be at risk of missing out.

 

Develop further the role of prefects to develop the skills and attributes of individuals rather than focusing on current strengths. There is scope to capitalise and develop the leadership skills of younger learners. This should build on prior learning and the roles they have held in primary school.

 

 

ADDITIONAL QI 2.2 Curriculum

How would we evaluate this QI using the HGIOS?4 six-point scale?

Excellent    Very Good    Good

Satisfactory    Weak    Unsatisfactory

How are we doing? What’s working well for our learners? What are the features of effective practice in our school?)

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS FROM LAST YEAR’S IMPROVEMENT PLAN

How do we know?  What evidence do we have of positive impact on our learners?

 

MAKE BRIEF REFERENCES TO SUPPORTING DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

What could we do now?  What actions would move us forward?

 

improvement priorities highlighted in this area – SIP PRIORITIES SELECTED FROM THESE

 

 

 

 

 

 

THEMES

·      Rationale and design

 

·      Development of the curriculum

 

·      Learning pathways

 

·      Skills for learning, life and work

·         The curriculum rationale details the school’s approach to the BGE and the senior phase. It emphasises the importance of providing support for young people, the role of key adults in assisting young people to discuss and understand their learning, tracking and monitoring progress, and interdisciplinary learning.

·         Young people are offered a range of vocational opportunities and learning experiences throughout the session delivered by a number of Partners. These include the Associated Primaries, Abriachan Forest Trust, The Shirlie Project, a local nursery, The Glenurquhart Centre, The Glen Urquhart Childcare Centre, Highlife Highland, The Calman Trust and local businesses/restaurants. Young people are offered a range of vocational opportunities in the senior phase through the local University of Highlands and Islands (UHI) partner college.

·         Recently, in consultation with young people, parents and partners, the school has developed further its curriculum. The new curriculum, which is based on a 32-period week, provides young people with a broader range of study options. As well as extending current BGE provision of music, art and social subjects young people also have new learning opportunities. These include YPI, STEM and Global Citizenship interdisciplinary. In the Senior Phase new learning opportunities include Environmental Science at S4 and at S5 and S6, a range of electives. These include computer coding, digital photography, drama, hair, beauty, creative sewing and additional PE. Young people in S5 and S6 also develop their skills in financial management and cookery, through mandatory ten-week courses. Young people have evaluated changes to the curriculum positively.

·         Local partner Cobbs trains all of our S6 pupils, on the commercial coffee machine he supplied, to be Baristas.

·         The school shows commitment to providing individualised learning pathways for young people through the aspirations of its new curriculum. It also provides highly-appropriate, flexible pathways for young people who are experiencing barriers to their learning.

·         Young people have good access to advice and guidance to assist them in making informed choices about their subjects and next steps beyond school. Guidance staff, senior leaders, and the SDS Career Adviser tailor advice to individual needs and circumstances. Additionally, school events, such as the annual S3 ‘Week of Work’ and the whole school Careers Fair exemplify how the school is supporting young people to make informed decisions.

 

HMIe Summarised Inspection Findings 2018.

 

Creative IDL work displayed at stalls during school events.

 

Successes and activities shared: in newsletters; school website; Facebook page.

 

PT and Staff Meeting Minutes.

 

Elected members of the Authority and journalists attended the YPI event.

 

GUHS pupils’ art and performances can be viewed, for another year, on BBC Tenpieces website.

 

Posters and photographs of previous shows adorn the school walls.

 

The Awards Ceremony is an opportunity so celebrate all of the varied successes of our pupils, at all levels and in all contexts.

 

The positive ethos in the school suggests the curriculum engages and supports all learners.

 

Careers Fair, the Week of Work and Work Experience help to enhance the development of our pupils’ skills for learning, life and work.

 

Composite classes in the Senior Phase add inclusiveness to the learning experience.

 

 

The school’s timetable is now in-line with many of the schools in Inverness and the surrounding areas. As a result we can continue to expand opportunities in the Senior Phase including engaging with more UHI and with the Highland Council Virtual Academy. This will include further opportunities to access Foundation Apprenticeship provision.

 

 

We require to fully encompass Developing the Young Workforce by implementing the Career Education Standards (CES) and Workplace Standards (WPS). This will include a new Working Group to manage our S3 “Week of Work” and a new approach to Work Experience which will focus on individual needs at a time when it will be of most benefit.

 

The Senior Phase Options booklet should be adapted further to identify consistently all available progression routes including the range of possible employment opportunities, that link to each subject at each level.

 

 






 


 

 

QI 2.2 Curriculum: Theme 3 Learning Pathways

How are we doing? What’s working well for our learners? What are the features of effective practice in our school?)

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS FROM LAST YEAR’S IMPROVEMENT PLAN

How do we know?  What evidence do we have of positive impact on our learners?

 

MAKE BRIEF REFERENCES TO SUPPORTING DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

What could we do now?  What actions would move us forward?

 

improvement priorities highlighted in this area – SIP PRIORITIES SELECTED FROM THESE

NB – See Above


 

 

 


 

QI 2.7 Partnerships – theme 3 Impact on Learners

How are we doing? What’s working well for our learners? What are the features of effective practice in our school?)

FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS FROM LAST YEAR’S IMPROVEMENT PLAN

How do we know?  What evidence do we have of positive impact on our learners?

 

MAKE BRIEF REFERENCES TO SUPPORTING DATA AND OTHER INFORMATION

What could we do now?  What actions would move us forward?

 

improvement priorities highlighted in this area – SIP PRIORITIES SELECTED FROM THESE

NB – This theme does not need to be evaluated using the six point scale.  Remember to focus on parental involvement.

·      Almost all parents who responded to the pre-inspection questionnaires are satisfied with the school and the way that it is led. They appreciate the increased use of technology for keeping them informed of the life and work of the school. In particular, this has given a higher profile to promoting the successes of young people. The newly-introduced digital system of communicating information on homework is increasingly being used across departments. This is being received well by parents and young people.

·      The Parent Council is very supportive of the school. They have been advising on developments to the curriculum and reporting of young people’s progress. The Parent Council takes forward very important activities to promote equity for all young people. They are proactive in raising funds, and in securing community grants and resources. The Parent Council has a strong say in how these funds are used. This includes supporting as many young people as possible to participate in international visits and residential experiences.

·     As of next year we have managed to secure a partnership with Highland Rugby Club/SRU to run School of Rugby here with our new S1 pupils. This would involve pupils (boys and girls) electing to participate in this programme to learn rugby skills and health and wellbeing skills; these pupils would be timetabled once a week (next year during PE and PSE lessons) and all classes would be led by fully qualified SRU coaches. The pupils are signed up for this class by their parents and have to adhere to a code of conduct. This is a growing programme which has been successfully run in schools across the country and is an exciting new partnership for us.

 

HMIe Summarised Inspection Findings 2018.

 

Insight Data.

 

Authority Produced Data spreadsheet.

 

Parental meetings are very well attended.

 

Parents regularly contact the school regarding their child’s progress. Strong school/home links.

 

Positive feedback from parent and pupil evaluations.

 

“Cause for Concern” sent home by teachers if a pupil’s progress is deemed a concern.

 

Strong rate of positive destinations.

 

Ever increasing numbers of pupils taking Advanced Highers this year.

 

 

 

Just under a half of parents indicated in the pre-inspection questionnaires that more family learning activities would be beneficial.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

PART TWO – School Improvement Plan

Summary: Key School Improvement Priorities (add further rows if required).  The priorities selected should be drawn from the possible improvement activities identified in the Standards and Quality Report.

Improvement Priority Title

Relevant QI(s) and Theme(s)

 

Universal and Targeted Support - Review how we deliver Key Adult

2.1 Safeguarding and child

protection 2.4 Personalised support 3.2 Raising attainment and

achievement

Developing the Young Workforce

2.6 Transitions 2.7 Partnerships 3.3 Increasing creativity and

employability

 

Closing the Attainment Gap

 

1.5 Management of resources

to promote equity 3.1 Ensuring wellbeing, equality and inclusion  3.2 Raising attainment and

achievement 

 

SQA Changes to Advanced Higher

2.2 Curriculum

3.2 Raising attainment and achievement

 

Health and Wellbeing

 

1.1 Self-evaluation for self-improvement

1.3 Leadership of change

 3.1 Ensuring wellbeing, equality and inclusion

Learning and Teaching with an emphasis this session on delivery through Digital Technology

 

1.2 Leadership of Learning  1.3 Leadership of change 3.2 Raising attainment and achievement

HGIOS 4 Self Evaluation

1.1 Self-evaluation for

self-improvement

1.3 Leadership of change

3.2 Raising attainment and

achievement

 

Complete a detailed action plan for each of these agreed priorities on the following pages (add more pages if required).  Please also use the table in Appendix 3 to help with planning for the monitoring and evaluation of improvement activity in terms of measuring impact.


 

 

In depth action plan 1 - Improvement Priority title: Universal and Targeted Support - Review how we deliver Key Adult

Linked to QI/Theme: 2.1, 2.4, 3.2

 

Linked to National Improvement Framework Priority (check all that apply):

 

Ø  Improvement in attainment, particularly in literacy and numeracy

Ø  Closing the attainment gap between the most and least disadvantaged children

Ø  Improvement in children and young people’s health and wellbeing

Ø  Improvement in employability skills and sustained, positive school leaver destinations for all young people

 

Linked to National Improvement Drivers (check any that apply):

Ø  School Leadership     Teacher Professionalism    Parental Engagement    Assessment of Children’s Progress    School Improvement Q   Performance Information Q

What difference will it make for learners? (what impact do we expect to see?  List specific expected outcomes):

Learners will have an approachable mentor.

Success criteria (how will we know if the change has been an improvement?):

Through review of Key Adult meeting notes – success is intrinsic; greater confidence in pupils seeking support.

Monitoring and evaluation procedures (how will we know if our success criteria have been met and what evidence will we have to inform our next annual School Improvement Plan Report?):

This will be monitored through Closing the Attainment Gap measurements and will be reflected in end of year CAG review report

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

PT ASN, PSAs, HT, DHT

What exactly are we going to do? (detail of specific actions undertaken to achieve desired impact)

Due to staffing pressures, unable to offer Universal Support Key Adult this session. Once our PSA complement is at the correct level, PSAs will mentor our identified ‘At Risk’ Closing the Attainment Gap pupils through one to one Key Adult meetings. This will be funded by  PEF.

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

PT ASN, PSAs, HT, DHT

Equity implications: (how will you ensure that pupils experiencing disadvantage will not be adversely affected by this improvement project?  Briefly mention any relevant points from your Pupil Equity Fund planning.)

This project targets PEF pupils and other pupils in need of support.

Staff wellbeing and pastoral support implications: (how will you ensure that this improvement project does not impact negatively on staff wellbeing and workload?)

Have reviewed staff welfare and pressures on staff means we cannot offer Universal Support but only targeted support.

Creativity opportunities: (how can opportunities be included in this project to address the development of creativity skills in pupils?  If completing this box, make specific reference to the development of the key creativity skills of open-mindedness, problem-solving, curiosity and imagination)

n/a

Expected resource needs (including costings if applicable): (Allocation of Pupil Equity Funding should be referenced briefly in this box, if appropriate)

PEF funding – time for PSAs to meet and write up minutes


 

In depth action plan 2 - Improvement Priority title: Closing the Attainment Gap

Linked to QI/Theme:3.1, 3.2, 1.5

 

Linked to National Improvement Framework Priority (check any that apply):

 

Ø  Improvement in attainment, particularly in literacy and numeracy

Ø  Closing the attainment gap between the most and least disadvantaged children

Ø  Improvement in children and young people’s health and wellbeing

Ø  Improvement in employability skills and sustained, positive school leaver destinations for all young people

Linked to National Improvement Driver (check any that apply):

Ø  School Leadership        Teacher Professionalism        Parental Engagement        Assessment of Children’s Progress

What difference will it make for learners? (what impact do we expect to see?):

Learners will identify healthy lifestyle choices; targeted learners will improve in self-confidence, will have further opportunities for coaching discussions with their key professional and will become more confident with their Literacy and Numeracy skills. Aim to see improvements in resilience, attainment and achievement in BGE and SP, improved health and wellbeing and enhanced opportunities for pupil leadership.

Success criteria (how will we know if the change has been an improvement?):

Focus Groups throughout the year will measure targeted pupils’ resilience; Literacy and Numeracy levels will show an improvement over the course of the year in BGE; SCQF tariff points should show improvements over the longer term; further opportunities to promote and celebrate pupil success; ‘at risk’ pupils shared and discussed regularly to ensure optimum attainment .

What exactly are we going to do? (detail of specific actions)

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

 

All projects led through the ‘Closing the Attainment Gap’ Working Group, composed of the individuals listed below.

 

1.        Plans for 2019/20

Same themes as last year for focus: resiliency, parental engagement, attainment and achievement, measuring success, health and wellbeing and pupil leadership.

 

1.        Moniack Mhor Writing group to continue. Group 2 to take place later in term 3/start of term 4. Publication of Group 1 material aimed for pre-Christmas – a celebration event to be organised. Led by: Neil McGregor.

2.        Continue with the Shieling Project for cohort 3, focus this year on renewables. One trip has already been done and feedback from those involved is positive. Andy Hay to lead next trip (25/9) due to scheduling conflicts. Led by: Kay Storey.

3.       An aim this year to invite parents to final Shieling to see what their children have accomplished in an aim to improve parental engagement. Led by: Iain Fulton & Kay Storey.

4.       Continue to utilise SQA Units and Awards to help pupils attain a greater number of SCQF tariff points. So far, for the majority of S4 pupils: YPI have gained Religion, Beliefs and Values Award; English have gained Media Analysis Unit SCQF4 and Scotland in Focus Unit SCQF4; PSE are running Mental Health and Wellbeing Award (focus on one Unit) at SCQF 5 with S5 this year. Science are investigating Science Unit at SCQF4 and Maths will now look at running a Personal Finance SCQF3/4 Unit. Led by: Iain Fulton.

5.       Precision Numeracy to take place between end of this term and Christmas (paired reading to start after Christmas). Led by: Alison Smith.

6.       Further Numeracy resources to be sourced for Study Club and any other appropriate venture (i.e. Mathletics); plans for a ‘Numeracy Expedition’ to be discussed with aim to build further enthusiasm for Numeracy. Led by: Alison Smith

7.       Literacy and Numeracy study club to continue on a Tuesday, further Numeracy resources provided by Maths via Chromebook apps and further Literacy resources provided by English through older style past papers. Iain to invite all S1 and regular attenders. Led by: Susan Simpson and Audrey Graesser.

8.       Reading Rewards programme to continue in English, possibly replacing Reading Log homeworks. This gives an opportunity to celebrate pupil success. Possible Prefect role available here too.  Led by: Neil McGregor and Kay Storey.

9.       Pupil Focus Groups, BGE data, tariff points and ‘at risk’ pupil tracking to continue to measure success. Led by: Iain Fulton.

10.     Fruit for Thought initiative to continue to help improve healthy eating habits. Led by: Halina Rees.

11.      To improve ‘real life’ maths skills, the Study Club and Shieling pupils who attend Landmark to be given the opportunity to plan and budget for the next trip. Led by: Alison Smith, Iain Fulton, Susan Simpson and Audrey Graesser.

12.     A professional writer to run a one off workshop for all S1 to build further enthusiasm for literacy. Led by: Iain Fulton.

 

In addition, see Action Plan: Universal and Targeted Support - Review how we deliver Key Adult as this will be funded by PEF to offer emotional, pastoral and academic support to targeted pupils.

Monitoring and evaluation procedures (how will we know if our success criteria have been met and what evidence will we have to inform our next annual School Improvement Plan Report?):

Focus Groups throughout the year will measure targeted pupils’ confidence in the projects; Literacy and Numeracy levels will show an improvement over the course of the year; parental feedback; staff feedback.

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

‘Closing the Attainment Gap’ Working Group, throughout session 2019/20 led by Iain Fulton, DHT.

Equity implications: (how will you ensure that pupils experiencing disadvantage will not be adversely affected by this improvement project?)

This improvement project is designed to narrow the attainment gap, ergo is focused largely on these pupils.

Staff wellbeing and pastoral support implications: (how will you ensure that this improvement project does not impact negatively on staff wellbeing and workload?)

All members of group have individual responsibilities: as group leader I will co-ordinate, we will meet regularly to evaluate progress and see if further resources are required.

Creativity opportunities: (how can opportunities be included in this project to address the development of creativity skills in pupils?)

Moniack Mhor; Shieling Project; excursion planning led by pupils; Senior Pupil leadership opportunities.

Expected resource needs (including costings if applicable):  Allocation of Pupil Equity Funding should be referenced in this box, if appropriate:

See PEF budget plan.


 

 

In depth action plan 3 - Improvement Priority title: SQA Changes to AH

Linked to QI/Theme: 2.2, 3.2

 

Linked to National Improvement Framework Priority (check any that apply):

 

Ø  Improvement in attainment, particularly in literacy and numeracy

Ø  Closing the attainment gap between the most and least disadvantaged children

Ø  Improvement in children and young people’s health and wellbeing

Ø  Improvement in employability skills and sustained, positive school leaver destinations for all young people

Linked to National Improvement Driver (check any that apply):

Ø  School Leadership        Teacher Professionalism        Parental Engagement        Assessment of Children’s Progress

What difference will it make for learners? (what impact do we expect to see?):

Learners will have more opportunity to strive for AH with new 40% cut off for D grade – will mean that teacher judgement in terms of placing will be vital.

Success criteria (how will we know if the change has been an improvement?):

High levels of attainment to continue.

What exactly are we going to do? (detail of specific actions)

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

In some cases courses will have to be rewritten entirely; in all cases there will need to be significant alterations made to existing courses in a very tight timescale in order to meet SQA demands. All PTs and all teachers will be heavily involved in this – it will take up a large proportion of development time this upcoming year.

 

Monitoring and evaluation procedures (how will we know if our success criteria have been met and what evidence will we have to inform our next annual School Improvement Plan Report?):

Success will be when pupils are able to sit new AH exams.

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

All PTs and all teaching staff.

Equity implications: (how will you ensure that pupils experiencing disadvantage will not be adversely affected by this improvement project?)

Through in-class support and alternative assessment arrangements where appropriate. This will potentially mean an additional workload for the ASN department to ensure the majority of pupils are equipped to sit new qualifications.

Staff wellbeing and pastoral support implications: (how will you ensure that this improvement project does not impact negatively on staff wellbeing and workload?)

This demand by the SQA and the tight timescale will impact on staff workload – in order to alleviate the pressure, it will be necessary to curtail other development tasks until these changes are embedded.

Creativity opportunities: (how can opportunities be included in this project to address the development of creativity skills in pupils?)

Peer to peer revision techniques can be included to ensure all pupils have thorough understanding of requirements of new AH qualifications.

Expected resource needs (including costings if applicable):  Allocation of Pupil Equity Funding should be referenced in this box, if appropriate:

Time will be a valued resource in order to allow teaching professionals to create and/or adjust courses accordingly. Money will need to be made available for supply budget as opportunities for internal cover are very limited at best. New resources may be required as well as staff attendance at appropriate SQA events.

 

In depth action plan #4 Learning & Teaching Working Group 2019-2020

Improvement Priority title: Using GSuite to Support Teaching & Learning

Linked to QI/Theme: 2.3 Learning, teaching and assessment

 

Linked to National Improvement Framework Priority (check all that apply):

 

Ø  Improvement in attainment, particularly in literacy and numeracy

Ø  Closing the attainment gap between the most and least disadvantaged children

Ø  Improvement in children and young people’s health and wellbeing

Ø  Improvement in employability skills and sustained, positive school leaver destinations for all young people

 

Linked to National Improvement Drivers (check any that apply):

Ø  School Leadership     Teacher Professionalism    Parental Engagement    Assessment of Children’s Progress    School Improvement Q   Performance Information Q

What difference will it make for learners? (what impact do we expect to see?  List specific expected outcomes):

·         Teaching staff have easy access to resources to allow more effective learning and teaching.

·         All staff know where to find school policies to inform their teaching practice to ensure the needs of all learners are met.

·         The learners benefit from improved use of digital technology within their learning environment.

Success criteria (how will we know if the change has been an improvement?):

·         Staff are using the Google Site to access material needed.

·         Those with barriers to learning demonstrate an improved engagement with their learning materials.

Monitoring and evaluation procedures (how will we know if our success criteria have been met and what evidence will we have to inform our next annual School Improvement Plan Report?):

·         Staff will be surveyed as to their needs for the Google Site as part of the design process.

·         Staff will be surveyed again to evaluate the Google site effectiveness.

·         Pupil feedback will inform how effective the use of digital technology has had on their learning.

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

·         Sharing Google Practice – LA at All Staff Meetings.

·         Survey Staff of needs for Google Site – HR/PB by Easter 2020

·         Plan needs of Google site – AH/FN/LA by Easter 2020

·         Build template site – All L&T WG end summer term 2020

What exactly are we going to do? (detail of specific actions undertaken to achieve desired impact)

 

Continue sharing Google Classroom practice across the school staff at DM’s.

 

Build a google site to replace the current shared drive. The Google site will allow staff to access whole school materials in a more organised manner. There is currently concern over the currently used S-drive and the sustainability of this. Therefore a more sustainable method would be to move to fully access the utilities freely available on Google drive. This process will take 2 academic sessions to have a fully implemented working Google Site that is effective in use. Session 2019-2020 will be used for the planning and build the capability within the working group to build the Google site. Session 2020-2021 will see the final product being implemented and assessed for suitability. 

 

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

 

Learning Teaching Working Group

Equity implications: (how will you ensure that pupils experiencing disadvantage will not be adversely affected by this improvement project?  Briefly mention any relevant points from your Pupil Equity Fund planning.)

Young people with specific academic needs will benefit greatly in the longer term as resources that help them overcome their barriers to learning will be easier to access by teaching staff.

Staff wellbeing and pastoral support implications: (how will you ensure that this improvement project does not impact negatively on staff wellbeing and workload?)

The project will be carried out with input from all teaching staff to ensure suitability for use. The project will be completed over two academic sessions so as not to adversely impact staff workload.

Creativity opportunities: (how can opportunities be included in this project to address the development of creativity skills in pupils?  If completing this box, make specific reference to the development of the key creativity skills of open-mindedness, problem-solving, curiosity and imagination)

 

Expected resource needs (including costings if applicable): (Allocation of Pupil Equity Funding should be referenced briefly in this box, if appropriate)

Time for staff to develop the skills needed to build the site.

Access to other school examples to use as a reference point.

Time allocated at all staff meetings to share practice.

 

 

In depth action plan 5 – Health & Wellbeing Working Group 2019-20

Improvement Priority title: Develop tracking and monitoring of HWB across learning, linked to HWB days, across S1-S6

Linked to QI/Theme: 1.1 Self-evaluation for self-improvement, 1.3 Leadership of change, 3.1 Ensuring wellbeing, equality and inclusion

 

Linked to National Improvement Framework Priority (check any that apply):

Ø  Closing the attainment gap between the most and least disadvantaged children

Ø  Improvement in children and young people’s health and wellbeing

Ø  Improvement in employability skills and sustained, positive school leaver destinations for all young people

Linked to National Improvement Driver (check any that apply):

Ø  School Leadership        Teacher Professionalism        Parental Engagement        Assessment of Children’s Progress

What difference will it make for learners? (what impact do we expect to see?):  Learners will identify more closely with their health and wellbeing and the purpose of HWB experiences and outcomes and the impact that these have them as an individual.

Success criteria (how will we know if the change has been an improvement?):

Once the new tracking and monitoring system is up and running, we hope to trial it in the next HWB day, which is Junior phase in May 2020.

What exactly are we going to do? (detail of specific actions)

We are going to dissect the wellbeing indicators and the E’s and O’s that link to them. We them hope to devise a clear and appropriate measure for monitoring and tracking these.  One idea we have discussed if self-evaluation at the end of each workshop with clear wellbeing links.

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

Health & Wellbeing Working Group - Rachel, Brian McNamara, Laura Fraser, Melody Walker, Leyla Nellan, Aimee Snoek, Donald McDiarmid.  Aim to implement to junior phase by June 2020.

Monitoring and evaluation procedures (how will we know if our success criteria have been met and what evidence will we have to inform our next annual School Improvement Plan Report?):

Once we have trialled it in the junior phase HWB day, we can gather the evaluation sheets at the end and discuss how it went and areas to improve. Once it has been successfully rolled out for junior and senior phase HWB days, then we can aim to implement it further within the school.

Who will lead this? (detail of responsibilities and timescales)

Health & Wellbeing Working Group - Rachel, Brian McNamara, Laura Fraser, Melody Walker, Leyla Nellan, Aimee Snoek, Donald McDiarmid.   Trailing throughout academic year.

Equity implications: (how will you ensure that pupils experiencing disadvantage will not be adversely affected by this improvement project?)

The HWB group will make sure that these changes are designed to positively impact all pupils whatever their circumstances, to comply with GIRFEC and HWB indictors.

Staff wellbeing and pastoral support implications: (how will you ensure that this improvement project does not impact negatively on staff wellbeing and workload?)

I will make sure the goal this year realistic and achievable and one that we can see some progress with, without it being too overwhelming.

Creativity opportunities: (how can opportunities be included in this project to address the development of creativity skills in pupils?)

As this project develops there is the potential for pupils to be significantly involved in changes that might be made to the tracking and monitoring system. We will be asking for pupils feedback and input at the HWB days and also assigning roles to our HWB prefect to help organise and orchestrate with us.

Expected resource needs (including costings if applicable):  Allocation of Pupil Equity Funding should be referenced in this box, if appropriate:

We should be able to implement through the use of Chromebook, therefore not incurring any additional costs.

 

Policy that we are using to implement the action plan:

Health and wellbeing across learning: responsibilities of all

Experiences and outcomes

 

 

Learning in health and wellbeing ensures that children and young people develop the knowledge and understanding, skills, capabilities and attributes which they need for mental, emotional, social and physical wellbeing now and in the future.

 

Learning through health and wellbeing promotes confidence, independent thinking and positive attitudes and dispositions. Because of this, it is the responsibility of every teacher to contribute to learning and development in this area.

Building the Curriculum 1

 

Each establishment, working with partners, should take a holistic approach to promoting health and wellbeing, one that takes account of the stage of growth, development and maturity of each individual, and the social and community context.

 

 

I can expect my learning environment to support me to:

 

·         develop my self-awareness, self-worth and respect for others

·         meet challenges, manage change and build relationships

·         experience personal achievement and build my resilience and confidence

·         understand and develop my physical, mental and spiritual wellbeing and social skills

·         understand how what I eat, how active I am and how decisions I make about my behaviour and relationships affect my physical and mental wellbeing

·         participate in a wide range of activities which promote a healthy lifestyle

·         understand that adults in my school community have a responsibility to look after me, listen to my concerns and involve others where necessary

·         learn about where to find help and resources to inform choices

·         assess and manage risk and understand the impact of risk-taking behaviour

·         reflect on my strengths and skills to help me make informed choices when planning my next steps

acknowledge diversity and understand that it is everyone’s responsibility to challenge discrimination

 

APPENDIX 1: Completion advice

This template contains two parts, which should be completed as follows:

PART ONE – Standards and Quality Report referencing previous Improvement Plan and next steps

This is the “Standards and Quality Report” part of the document.  In this section you should evaluate where you are with regard to the QIs and themes from How good is our school? (4th edition) selected by Education Scotland as being of key importance.  Your analysis of these must include analysis of improvements arising from your last School Improvement Plan and will relate to the NIF priorities and Highland Council/Regional Improvement Collaborative priorities as appropriate.

You may have improvement priorities from your last School Improvement Plan which relate to QIs from HGIOS?4 other than the NIF QIs.  If so add the details in the appropriate section.  Please note that there is an expectation that, over a number of years, you will evaluate all of the QIs.  Details from last year’s S&Q Report can be cut, pasted and edited into this session’s Report and additional QIs addressed as new work within your school.  For example, last year you will have evaluated QIs 1.1, 1.3, 2.3, 3.1 and 3.2 plus one other.  This year you would include all of these, editing your self-evaluation from last session, plus one or two more QIs, making 8 in total.  If you have the capacity in your school to do more, that is a choice to be made at local level.

Note that there is an expectation that schools will have evaluated where they are in each QI included, using the 6-point scale in HGIOS?4.  Individual themes should not be evaluated in this way.  Evaluations should involve selecting ONE of the six evaluative statements for each QI.

Note that your self-evaluation in the S&Q Report should specifically address your progress towards the NIF priorities and local priorities from Highland Council (though of course these will overlap significantly).  Please make such comments explicit (i.e. they should reference the NIF priorities directly and in the second column should include supporting data and other evidence).

Key priorities chosen from PART ONE can be highlighted and then subsequently fleshed out in PART TWO.  A key part of the process is the selection of priorities from the many possible projects your self-evaluation will have identified.

Should you have a visit from HMI, the information from PART ONE can be updated, then cut and pasted into the self-evaluation document which you would be required to prepare for the HMI visit.  If you are using the Highland Council HGIOS?4 self-evaluation templates (ensuring an evidence-based approach to this self-evaluation activity) you will be able to cut and paste your comments into this document, as the columns correspond.

NB – There is an expectation that your Standards and Quality Report will be shared with the school community on demand.  Please be sure that you and your staff are happy that what you have recorded in your self-evaluation sheets is suitable for sharing.  If you wish to, you could save your self-evaluation sheets as a separate file (so that you have a record) and then edit the sheets in the Standards and Quality Report until you are comfortable with sharing them.  Please note that a summary of your Standards & Quality Report should be shared with the whole Parent Forum.  The format you choose for this is your decision, but an exemplar summary S&Q Report was shared in session 17/18 and can be obtained from your Quality Improvement Officer.

 

PART TWO – School Improvement Plan

In this section identify key priorities that you will take forward in the forthcoming year’s School Improvement Plan.  Give each planned change a title and then complete a detailed action plan for each.  It is recommended that schools restrict planning to three main priorities, but depending on local circumstance you may have more than three action plans.  If so, simply copy the relevant boxes for completion.

Note that there is an expectation that your implementation plans will include detailed monitoring and evaluation of progress against carefully defined expectations of impact.  Appendices 2, 3 and 4 provide support with this process.  Please note also the expectation that for each plan there will be detail about accountability in terms of individual responsibilities and specific timescales.  This is an opportunity to demonstrate, through your In-depth action plan, the way that leadership of change is distributed across your school community.

During the window for submission of your S&Q Report and School Improvement plan, please liaise with your Quality Improvement Officer over the content and with any questions that you may have about the process.

For further advice on completing this document, please contact your Quality Improvement Officer.


 

APPENDIX 2: Advice on designing outcome statements (from presentation by Craig Melrose, Development Officer – Scottish Attainment Challenge, Education Scotland)
APPENDIX 3: Table for recording and reporting on progress with individual aspects of plans

(adapted from presentation by Craig Melrose, Development Officer – Scottish Attainment Challenge, Education Scotland)

IMPROVEMENT PLAN TITLE

What data/evidence informs this priority?

OUTCOMES

Detail targets, % etc for 18/19 and beyond

INTERVENTION(S)

 

EXPECTED IMPACT

MEASURES

What ongoing information will demonstrate progress? (Qualitative, quantitative – short/medium/long term data

ACTUAL IMPACT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This table can be cut and pasted into a separate Word document.  Use as many as you need to record progress with the plans.  This table will correlate with the relevant boxes in the In-depth action plans – these tables would be your working documents to evidence progress with your SIP.

APPENDIX 4: Sample completed table for recording and reporting on progress with individual aspects of plans (courtesy Craig Melrose/Education Scotland)

 

APPENDIX 5: Scottish Government’s 3-Step Improvement Framework for Scotland’s Public Services

In considering your Improvement Planning process, it is useful to bear in mind the Scottish Government’s 3-Step Improvement Framework for Scotland’s Public Services.  The full document can be obtained from your Quality Improvement Officer.

 

Ø  Step 1 is ensuring that there is clarity about the vision and strategy for the planned improvement (including understanding of how the change will work and who will drive it).

 

 

 

Ø  Step 2 is about ensuring the conditions are right to allow the improvement to flourish.  These six questions should be asked of every planned improvement:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø  Step 3 is the implementation phase.  The focus should always be on the simple formula of aims, measures, testing and changes.  The underlying principle in the recommended improvement methodology is “Aim big, start small”.


 

APPENDIX 6: Glossary of terms

Attainment

The measurable progress which children and young people
make as they progress through and beyond school. This progress is in relation to
curriculum areas and in the development of skills for learning, life and work.

Achievement

The totality of skills and attributes embedded within the four capacities of Curriculum for Excellence and developed across the curriculum in school and through learning in other contexts.

Creativity

The process which generates ideas that have value to the individual. It involves looking at familiar things with a fresh eye, examining problems with an open mind, making connections, learning from mistakes and using imagination to explore new possibilities.

Closing the attainment gap

Working to reduce the gap in progress, attainment and achievement between those living in Scotland’s least and most disadvantaged homes. Many children and young people from lower-income households do significantly worse at all levels of the education system than those from better-off homes.

Disadvantage

This is a term used to describe the extent to which children experience socio-economic barriers to their progress.  It is commonly measured using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD), which was used to determine which schools received Scottish Attainment Challenge funding, or by considering Free School Meal entitlement, which was used to calculate Pupil Equity Funding allocations.

Equity

Treating people fairly, but not necessarily treating people the same.  Equity in education means that personal or social circumstances such as gender, ethnic origin or family background are not obstacles to achieving educational potential and that all our young people are well supported to secure wellbeing, skills for learning, life and work and the best possible post-school destination.

Family learning

This is a powerful method of engagement and learning which can foster positive attitudes towards life-long learning, promote socio-economic resilience and challenge educational disadvantage.  Engagement with families is  going to be crucial in addressing the equity gap.

Partners

Partners include all individuals or organisations that deliver learning and contribute to the life and work of the school. These may include CLD services, colleges, universities, employers, third sector, community organisations, and libraries.  GIRFEC partners are the professional partners you work with who help you to address the GIRFEC agenda (e.g. Educational Psychology service, CSWs, Speech and Language Therapy and so on.)

Pupil Equity Funding

The Pupil Equity Funding is additional funding allocated directly to schools and targeted at closing the poverty related attainment gap. The Scottish Government has committed to this funding as part of the Scottish Attainment Challenge programme from 2017-18. The Pupil Equity Funding forms part of the £750m Attainment Scotland Fund.  It is allocated on the basis of Free School Meal entitlement.

Safeguarding

This is a much wider concept than child protection and refers to promoting the welfare of children. It encompasses: protecting children from maltreatment; preventing impairment of children’s health or development; ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care, and taking action to enable all children and young people to have the best outcome. Child protection is part of this definition and refers to activities undertaken to prevent children suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm.

School community

This means all children and young people, staff, parents/carers, families and partners who are connected to the school.

Volunteers

This means everyone who contributes to the school’s curriculum (in the widest sense) by offering activities and opportunities for children, but who are not employed to do this.  Parents running after school clubs or school chaplains offering lunchtime drop-in sessions would be two examples of volunteers.